chess4j + Prophet integration status 5/17/20

Several months ago I wrote about a proof-of-concept JNI integration between chess4j and Prophet4. At the time I had managed to compile Prophet4 as a static library, load that library into chess4j and write a JNI layer. The only function the Prophet4 library was serving at the time was for endpoint evaluation, but it was enough to show the idea was viable. Based on the success of the proof-of-concept, I’ve decided to go “all in” with this chess4j + Prophet4 integration. And, it’s going really well.

Since the time I wrote that article, I’ve added a search function to Prophet4 with some basic heuristics, as well as an iterative deepening driver. I’ve also added some additional JNI layer code that allows chess4j to utilize Prophet’s search. The native code runs 2-3x faster, so there is a tremendous speed improvement.

I’ve also realized some benefits when it comes to testing. Just to be able to compare apples to apples, I’ve stripped a lot of chess4j code out to simplify the search to the exact equivalent of Prophet’s. It didn’t really bother me too much to do that, because I wanted to refactor it to improve the test coverage anyway. Now, I’m building both programs back up, feature by feature. I’ve found that it’s often easier to build more comprehensive tests in Java, largely due to the ease of “injecting” mocked dependencies. As a feature is implemented in chess4j and I’m satisfied with the testing, I’ll implement the same feature in Prophet4. I still add tests in P4, using Google’s test framework, but not always as comprehensive. Then, the JNI layer is leveraged to ensure that the searches traverse exactly the same tree, produce the same score, and that the iterative deepening driver produces exactly the same PV. Proving that the searches are equivalent gives a sort of transitivity argument.

So, chess4j and Prophet4 are now and probably forever linked. In some sense you could consider chess4j a Java port of Prophet4, or Prophet4 a C port of chess4j. But, there’s more to it than that. The programs serve different purposes. chess4j will be the more “feature complete” engine. It contains an opening book, where P4 does not. It will be capable of pondering, but P4 may not. Prophet4 will be the lighter weight / faster of the two and more suitable for testers that focus on engine-to-engine testing. The chess4j releases will include platform specific builds that utilize P4 as a static library, and for any platforms that aren’t included, the Java engine will still work.

For future work I’m envisioning an SMP implementation such as Young Brothers Wait in P4. P4 is the more likely to use tablebases. Since chess4j uses P4 as a static library, it will automatically benefit from those features. Macro level work such as distributed computing and learning experiments are more likely to be done in chess4j. Who knows, but for now I’m having fun. I guess that’s the main benefit.

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